Story
Blaine Adamson

Blaine Adamson, the owner of Hands On Originals, a promotional printing company, has turned down several requests to create shirts based on the message that he was asked to print on them. But when he declined one particular design, he faced charges of illegal discrimination.


 

That order came from the Gay and Lesbian Services Organization (GLSO), and the requested shirt promoted the group’s pride festival. Blaine explained that he could not print a shirt bearing a message that conflicts with his faith. He then offered to connect the GLSO to another printer who would create the shirts for the same price that he would have charged.

The GLSO rejected Blaine’s offer and filed a discrimination complaint with the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Human Rights Commission.

The Human Rights Commission declared that Blaine was guilty of illegal discrimination, and ordered him to print shirts with messages that conflict with his religious beliefs.

In May 2017, the Kentucky Court of Appeals got it right when it ruled that Blaine is free to decline orders that would require him to print messages that conflict with his religious beliefs.

The Lexington-Fayette Urban County Human Rights Commission appealed this decision to the Kentucky Supreme Court. On October 31, 2019, the Kentucky Supreme Court ruled in favor of Blaine, unanimously affirming that the Gay and Lesbian Services Organization did not have a legal right to sue Blaine or his business, Hands On Originals, for declining to print a message that violates his religious beliefs. 

Create Freely

Alliance Defending Freedom is here to protect the right of creative professionals to use their God-given talents in ways that are consistent with their beliefs.

Learn More

Share this page

Related Client Stories

Related Blog Posts